Feature

Answering GPs’ frequently asked questions about self-collection of HPV samples


Paul Hayes


8/03/2018 3:24:25 PM

GP and cervical screening expert Dr Lara Roeske has developed a series of videos designed to address GPs’ most frequently asked questions regarding self-collection of human papillomavirus samples.

Self-collection can offer an alternative pathway to overcome barriers some women experience to having a clinician-collected cervical screening test.
Self-collection can offer an alternative pathway to overcome barriers some women experience to having a clinician-collected cervical screening test.

Cervical screening in Australia changed from 1 December 2017, with Pap smears replaced with a five-yearly cervical screening test.
 
The renewed National Cervical Screening Program is for asymptomatic women who are vaccinated and unvaccinated for human papillomavirus (HPV) and who have commenced sexual activity. The program also provides advice about the management of symptomatic women.
 
Self-collection is an alternative pathway to overcome barriers some women experience to having a clinician-collected cervical screening test. Self-collection is available to women at least 30 years of age and who are considered under-screened (four or more years since their last Pap smear), or who have never been screened and who decline a clinician-collected specimen.
 
Dr Roeske’s videos address a number of key areas:

  • Who is eligible for self-collection?
  • Are self-collected samples any less reliable than the practitioner-collected samples?
  • How to collect a sample using the new liquid-based cytology
  • Can GPs test for chlamydia in addition to the cervical screening test?
  • Why are tests performed in a healthcare setting?
  • Who is responsible for the delivery of results through the new National Cervical Screening Program?
  • When should GPs not offer self-collection?
  • What equipment does a GP need to facilitate self-collection?
  • Tools available for GPs to collect a sample  

Further self-collection resources
Support self-collection in general practice, including a visual guide
 
Self-collection pilot study and publications relevant to the National Cervical Screening Program
 
National guidelines on self-collected vaginal samples



cervical-screening HPV-screening self-collection self-sampling





Comments



 Security code