News

NSW renting reforms to protect tenants in violent relationships


Paul Hayes


11/01/2019 11:58:30 AM

People experiencing family violence will be able to end their tenancy without financial penalty under new laws coming into effect in February.

Under the reforms, NSW real estate agents and landlords will be prohibited from listing survivors on a tenancy database if a lease is terminated due to family violence.
Under the reforms, NSW real estate agents and landlords will be prohibited from listing survivors on a tenancy database if a lease is terminated due to family violence.

The question ‘Why do they stay?’ is a common one when people look at situations of family violence.
 
While any answer to that question is an extremely complex one, financial issues are often a major contributing factor.
 
Beyond having a place to go, people experiencing family violence may not have the financial means to leave and, in many cases, have an existing financial burden that means they are unable to vacate a shared residence.
 
In an effort to alleviate this issue, the New South Wales Government is introducing new renting reforms designed to better protect tenants experiencing family violence, who will be able to immediately end their tenancy without financial penalty from 28 February.
 
‘Domestic violence is a harrowing and traumatic ordeal and victims shouldn’t be further punished when trying to escape,’ State Minister for Better Regulation Matt Kean said.
 
‘Victims are often at their most vulnerable when leaving a violent relationship and our reforms alleviate some of the pressure during a time of need.’
 
According to Mr Kean, NSW tenants are currently required to provide 14 days’ notice to break a fixed-term lease if a co-tenant or occupant is prohibited from accessing the property by a final apprehended violence order.
 
‘While victims are not liable to compensate the landlord for the early termination under the current laws, they may still be liable for other costs,’ he said.
 
‘Under our changes, victims can immediately end their tenancy where there is evidence of domestic violence, including a declaration from a medical practitioner or a domestic violence order.’
 
Agents and landlords will be prohibited from listing survivors on a tenancy database if a lease is terminated due to family violence.
 
Further information is available on the NSW Government website.



apprehended violence order family violence financial abuse New South Wales



Login to comment