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Rose-Hunt Award 2018: Dr Evan Ackermann


Morgan Liotta


10/10/2018 7:20:23 PM

Dr Evan Ackermann is the recipient of the 2018 Rose-Hunt Award, the RACGP’s highest accolade.

Dr Ackermann has made a considerable and valuable contribution to not only the RACGP, but the general practice profession over the years.
Dr Ackermann has made a considerable and valuable contribution to not only the RACGP, but the general practice profession over the years.

‘I am very humbled to be recognised by the college in this way. Being a GP has given me flexibility and opportunity in a career that I enjoy,’ Dr Evan Ackermann told newsGP upon hearing the news he had been named the recipient of the 2018 Rose-Hunt Award.
 
Dr Ackermann has made a considerable and valuable contribution to not only the RACGP, but the general practice profession over the years.
 
A long-time GP in Queensland, Dr Ackermann is the outgoing Chair of the RACGP Expert Committee – Quality Care (REC­–QC), and a prolific author and advisor on many RACGP resources. He has also been a continuous advocate for the college on a number of topics, such as the up-scheduling of codeine.
 
Although Dr Ackermann described receiving the Rose-Hunt Award as ‘personal’, he is quick to acknowledge others as being instrumental in providing their support.
 
‘I see [winning this award] as recognition for the hard work of the REC–QC over the years,’ he said.
 
‘Being the voice of safety and quality is made easy by the teamwork and dedication to general practice this committee has had over a very long time.’
 
Despite an extensive career in primary care, Dr Ackermann explored other avenues before settling as a GP.
 
‘My family had a background of engineering and nursing, but for some reason I always wanted to do medicine and to be the generalist doctor that addressed all problems,’ he said.
 
‘I was very attracted to rural general practice for that reason, and did the obstetrics, anaesthetics and surgery needed to support rural practice before the current training programs [were introduced].
 
‘Along the way I have also been a health administrator, practice owner, and on several health and quality associated boards and committees.
 
‘It was – and still is – a very winding path for a career.’
 
When asked what he loves most about being a GP, Dr Ackermann said it is his patients who bring him the most satisfaction.
 
‘It is a privilege to be a GP, to be involved in people’s lives with their families,’ he said.
 
‘Whether it is conversations with patients over a 20-plus-year timeframe, delivering their children and grandchildren, that time when your help made a big difference in their lives, or just growing older and keeping people healthy.
 
‘Even in death, some patients use their final days positively, to heal family fractures and bring people together.
 
‘Patients really are inspiring.’
 
And what does Dr Ackermann say to the GPs of the future?
 
‘Don’t be afraid to stand up for patient care and safety,’ he said.
 
‘Duty of care to patients, integrity and ethical behaviour is critical for you and the profession.’
 
Dr Ackermann offers a number of recommendations for GPs to help them perform at their best, including referring to the Red Book in the first patient consult of every year.
 
‘Preventive health is a foundation of general practice,’ he said. ‘Go through the Red Book; your patients will get used to it and will expect it.’
 
Revisiting his own connection to patients, Dr Ackermann encourages all GPs to follow some simple advice.
 
‘Innovate without throwing out quality and patient safety – which is precious. Keep connections with people,’ he said.



GP18 RACGP awards Rose-Hunt Award



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