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Kidney disease on the rise among older Australians: AIHW report


Morgan Liotta


4/07/2018 3:09:21 PM

Chronic kidney disease is increasing in older people, with the proportion of Australians aged 65–74 with the disease three times higher than for those aged 55–64, a recent report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has found.

The AIHW report supports findings of a stable prevalence rate of chronic kidney disease, with an increase of the number of people in its advanced stages.
The AIHW report supports findings of a stable prevalence rate of chronic kidney disease, with an increase of the number of people in its advanced stages.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has published a report focusing on chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its prevalence in different age demographics of Australian adults.
 
The report is based on data collected from two surveys incorporating biomedical testing that was undertaken in 1999–2000 (Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study [AusDiab]) and 2011–12 (National Health Measurement Survey [NHMS]).
 
Overall, there was no change in the adjusted prevalence rate of CKD between 1999–2000 and 2011–12. However, the number of people with moderate to severe loss of kidney function has nearly doubled between these periods, from one million in 1999–2000 to more than 1.5 million in 2011–12.
 
Population growth and ageing has primarily contributed to an increase in CKD prevalence, according to the AIHW data, with the majority of the increase attributed to people aged 65 and over.
 
The estimated size of the adult population with early stage (stages 1–2) CKD grew by 29% between 1999–2000 and 2011–2012 (from 740,000 to 950,000). The estimated size of the population with moderate to severe loss of kidney function (stages 3–5) nearly doubled, with an increase of 88% between 1999–2000 and 2011–2012 (from 322,000 to 604,000).
 
Findings in the report also reveal that the prevalence rate of adults with early stages of CKD increased for those aged 25–64 (from 4.5% to 5.7%), while the prevalence rate of adults with moderate to severe CKD increased from 3.1% in 1999–2000 to 4.4% in 2011–2012.
 
More than 90% of all CKD stages recorded in both surveys was for stage 3, with most cases in this cohort aged 65 and over.
 
The AIHW has concluded this growth in the size of population with moderate to severe CKD is reflected by an increase in the use of healthcare services for CKD treatment over the same period, with recorded hospital admissions and dialysis services also having risen.
 
The AIHW also found that the mortality rate of CKD and incidence rate of treated end-stage kidney disease remained stable, presenting a stable prevalence rate of CKD but an increase in the size of the population with advanced stages of CKD.
 
GP resources
The RACGP has resources aimed at the prevention and management of chronic disease, including CKD:



AIHW Australian Institute of Health and Welfare chronic kidney disease CKD





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